On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par BRH » Mercredi 15 Décembre 2010 15:15:31

http://www.bmj.com/content/341/bmj.c6805.full

Christmas 2010: History
Multidisciplinary medical identification of a French king’s head (Henri IV)
Philippe Charlier, forensic medical examiner and osteo-archaeologist12, Isabelle Huynh-Charlier, radiologist3, Joël Poupon, biological toxicologist4, Christine Keyser, specialist in forensic genetics5, Eloïse Lancelot, elemental toxicologist6, Dominique Favier, organic molecular analyst7, Jean-Noël Vignal, doctor in anthropology8, Philippe Sorel, arts historian9, Pierre F Chaillot, resident1, Rosa Boano, anthropologist10, Renato Grilletto, professor of anthropology10, Sylvaine Delacourte, perfumer11, Jean-Michel Duriez, perfumer12, Yves Loublier, palynologist13, Paola Campos, specialist in paleogenetics14, Eske Willerslev, professor in paleogenetics14, M T P Gilbert, specialist in paleogenetics14, Leslie Eisenberg, forensic anthropologist15, Bertrand Ludes, professor of legal medicine5, Geoffroy Lorin de la Grandmaison, professor of legal medicine1
+ Author Affiliations

1Department of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, University Hospital R Poincaré (AP-HP, UVSQ), 92380 Garches, France
2Department of Medical Ethics, Faculty of Medicine Paris 5, Paris, France
3Department of Radiology, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Paris, France
4Department of Biological Toxicology, University Lariboisière Hospital (AP-HP), Paris, France
5Medico-Legal Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg, France
6Applications Laboratory, Horiba Jobin Yvon, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
7International Flavours and Fragrancies (IFF), Neuilly sur Seine, France
8IRCGN, Forensic Anthropology, Rosny-sous-Bois, France
9Carnavalet Museum, Paris, France
10Department of Animal and Human Biology, University of Turin, Italy
11Guerlain, Perfumes Development, Paris, France
12Jean Patou/Rochas, Perfumes Development, Paris, France
13CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
14Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
15Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, WI, USA
Correspondence to: P Charlier ph_charlier@yahoo.fr
Accepted 19 November 2010
Philippe Charlier and a multidisciplinary team explain how they confirmed an embalmed head to be that of the French king Henry IV using a combination of anthropological, paleopathological, radiological, forensic, and genetic techniques

Since the desecration of the French kings’ graves in the basilica of Saint-Denis by the revolutionaries in 1793, few remains of these mummified bodies have been preserved and identified. After a multidisciplinary analysis, we confirmed that an embalmed head reputed to be that of the French king Henri IV and conserved in successive private collections did indeed belong to that monarch.

Next Section
Death of “the green gallant”
Henri IV was probably the most popular French king. He was known as “the good King Henry” or, because of his attractiveness to women, “the green gallant.” Despite being admired by his people, he was assassinated in Paris at the age of 57 years on 14 May 1610 by François Ravaillac, a fanatical Catholic.

Previous SectionNext Section
Identifying the remains of the French king
The human head had a light brown colour, open mouth, and partially closed eyes (fig 1⇓). The preservation was excellent, with all soft tissues and internal organs well conserved. Two features often seen in portraits of the monarch (fig 2⇓) were present: a dark mushroom-like lesion, 11 mm in length, just above the right nostril (fig 3A⇓),1 and a 4.5 mm central hole in the right ear lobe with a patina that was indicative of long term use of an earring (fig 3B). We know that Henri IV wore an earring in his right earlobe, as did others from the Valois court.2 A 5 mm healed bone lesion was present on the upper left maxilla (fig 3C), which corresponds to the trauma (stab wound) inflicted by Jean Châtel during a murder attempt on 27 December 1594.2 Many head hairs and remnants of a moustache and beard were present; they were red and white in colour, with a maximum length of 7 mm, 24 mm, and 60 mm, respectively (fig 3E and F). This fits with the known characteristics of the King’s hair at the time of his death.2 The head also showed evidence of baldness—no hair was present on the pate. Dental health was poor, with considerable antemortem tooth loss; this corresponds with testimonies from contemporaneous witnesses about the king.2 Lastly, three postmortem inferior cervical cutting wounds were visible, corresponding to the separation of the head from the body by a revolutionary in 1793, in the context of deliberate mutilation.3


View larger version:In a new windowDownload as PowerPoint SlideFig 1 Left lateral (A) and right lateral (B) view of the mummified head

View larger version:In a new windowDownload as PowerPoint SlideFig 2 A: Left sided view of the statue of King Henri IV at Pau Castle showing the nasal skin lesion. B: French engraving by Ganières showing the king wearing an earring in the right ear lobe

View larger version:In a new windowDownload as PowerPoint SlideFig 3 Details of the different facial characteristics: (A) nasal naevus (arrow), (B) pierced right ear lobe, (C) post-trauma maxillary bone lesion, (D) grey scalp deposit, (E) red moustache, and (F) red hairs
Previous SectionNext Section
Other evidence in favour of the identification
Radiocarbon dating with 2-sigma calibration yielded a date of between 1450 and 1650, which nicely bracketing the year of Henri IV’s death (1610).2

We could not recover uncontaminated mitochondrial DNA sequences from the head samples, so no comparison was possible with other relics from the king and his descendants.

Analysis of various grey deposits (fig 3D) on the head showed an elemental and organic composition corresponding to successive mouldings of the head. We know that three mouldings were carried out on Henri IV’s head: firstly on the fresh head in 1610,2 then on the mummified head in 1793 just after the desecration,3 and lastly by a previous owner (Bourdais) of the head at the beginning of the 20th century.

A digital facial reconstruction of the skull was fully consistent with all known representations of Henri IV and the plaster mould of his face made just after his death, which is conserved in the Sainte-Genevieve Library, Paris. The reconstructed head had an angular shape, with a high forehead, a large nose, and a prominent square chin (fig 4⇓).2 Superimposition of the skull on the plaster mould of his face and the statue at Pau Castle showed complete similarity with regard to all these anatomical features (fig 5⇓).


View larger version:In a new windowDownload as PowerPoint SlideFig 4 Digital reconstruction of (A) the complete face and (B) the left side of the face using data from three dimensional computed tomography scans of the skull and the particular characteristics of the mummified head

View larger version:In a new windowDownload as PowerPoint SlideFig 5 A: Digital superimposition of (A) the computed tomography scan (right sided view of the skull) on to the face mould made just after Henry IV’s death. B: Digital superimposition of the computed tomography scan (sagittal section of the skull) on to the left sided view of the statue of the king at Pau Castle
Previous SectionNext Section
A very particular embalming method
The autopsy report of King Henri IV, published in the complete works of the surgeon Guillemeau (1549-1613),4 showed that the brain was not examined. Such an examination was not systematically performed when the cause of death was known (which for Henri IV was two knife wounds made in the thorax by Ravaillac).2 Another practitioner, Pigray (1532-1613), was in charge of the embalming process,5 and he took into account the king’s wish to be embalmed “in the style of the Italians.” This form of embalming minimises the mutilating aspect of the embalming procedure by not opening the skull—the brain and all internal structures remain in the skull (no vault sawing, no evacuating trepanation, no ethmoidal perforation). Computed tomography of the head confirmed that no sign of skull base or vault trauma (except for the old maxilla lesion), sawing, or opening of the cerebral cavity was present.

A circumferential band of black pigment was seen on the skin at the base of the neck. Using Raman spectroscopy, it was identified as ivory black, a variety of amorphous carbon. This charcoal, obtained by anaerobic calcination of animal bones, corresponds to that deposited by the surgeon Pigray on the surface of the cadaver to absorb decomposition fluids and putrefactive gases5; the precise upper limit of the cervical deposit may be explained by the head being protected by strips of cloth so that it was not blackened during the process.

We found many unidentifiable vegetal deposits in the mouth, which were, among other things, used to mask unpleasant odours that emanated from the oral cavity.6 Mercury was sometimes used when the skull was left intact. It was usually deposited as cinnabar salts within the nostrils, which were tightly packed with segments of textile.6 In this case, no trace of mercury was found in samples from the nostrils or the nasal cavity.

Previous SectionNext Section
Pathological background
Computed tomography also showed partially conserved dura mater and dried brain parenchyma, with no identifiable anomalies.7 Mummified vascular and nervous structures were seen in both orbital cavities, and the right orbital cavity contained a dense biconvex 7 mm disc. This disc corresponds to the eye lens, the high density (137 Hounsfield units) of which indicates the presence of a cataract. We also identified diffuse and moderate marginal spondylarthrosis in all cervical vertebrae.

Previous SectionNext Section
Conclusion
Now positively identified according to the most rigorous arguments of any forensic anthropology examination, the French king’s head will be reinterred in the royal basilica of Saint-Denis after a solemn funeral ceremony. Similar methods could be used to identify all the other kings’ and queens’ skeletons lying in the mass grave of the basilica, so that they can be returned to their original tombs.

Previous SectionNext Section
Notes
Cite this as: BMJ 2010;341:c6805

Previous SectionNext Section
Footnotes
Acknowledgments: All authors thank S Gabet (who rediscovered the head) and P Belet for historical investigations; J Bellanger (previous owner of the head); the conservators at Pontoise and Chateauroux et Pau; MH de La Mure (curator at the Sainte-Genevieve Library, Paris); MV Clin-Meyer (curator of the Museum of History of Medicine, Paris); Prince Louis-Alphonse de Bourbon and his secretary, X Bureau; Prince Michael of Greece; the French National Academy of Medicine (Paris); R Teyssou, who provided the endoscope; P Berche (Paris 5 University); A Jobet (IFF); and the BMJ reviewers (I Sosa and U Aasebo).
Funding: No particular funding was used for this study.
Competing interest declaration: All authors have completed the Unified Competing Interest form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf (available on request from the corresponding author) and declare: no support from any organisation for the submitted work; no relationships with any organisation that might have an interest in the submitted work in the past three years; no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.
Contributors: PC conceived and headed the project, did the anthropological and paleopathological analyses, and the microscopic and endoscopic examinations. IHC did the radiological examinations and three dimensional computed tomography reconstructions. JP and LE did the elemental analyses. DF did the molecular organic analyses. JNV did the three dimensional facial reconstructions. PS provided data about historical face moulding. PFC did cranial measurements from computed tomography reconstructions. RG and RB provided comparative data about the Italian embalming process. SD and JMD performed professional olfaction. YL carried out botanical (pollen) observation from oral deposits. PFC, EW, MTPG, CK, and BL did ancient DNA extractions and analyses. PC wrote most of the manuscript, with critical input from LE, JP, GLDLG, and the remaining authors. CK is guarantor?]
Provenance and peer review: Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
Previous Section
References
1.↵Lever DE, ed. Histopathology of the skin. 10th ed. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2008.2.↵Babelon JP. Henri IV. Fayard, 2009.3.↵De Lamartine A. Histoire des Girondins. Armand Le Chevalier, 1865.4.↵Guillemeau J. Oeuvres de chirurgie. Re-edition. Jean Viret, 1649. 5.↵Pigray P. Epitome des préceptes de médecine et de chirurgie. Jean Berthelin, 1625:398-400.6.↵Charlier P. Evolution of embalming methodology in medieval and modern France (Agnès Sorel, the Duc de Berry, Louis the XIth, Charlotte de Savoie). Med Secoli2006;18:777-97.[Medline]7.↵Rühli FJ, Chhem RK, Böni T. Diagnostic paleoradiology of mummified tissue: interpretation and pitfalls.
Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3593
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par BRH » Jeudi 16 Décembre 2010 10:27:58

Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3593
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par BRH » Jeudi 16 Décembre 2010 10:43:14

Philippe Charlier et une équipe multidisciplinaire expliquent comment ils ont confirmé une tête embaumée à celle du roi français Henri IV en utilisant une combinaison de techniques anthropologiques, paléopathologie, radiologiques, médico-légales et génétiques

Depuis la profanation des tombes des rois français »dans la basilique de Saint-Denis par les révolutionnaires en 1793, quelques restes de ces corps momifiés ont été conservés et identifiés. Après une analyse pluridisciplinaire, nous a confirmé que la tête embaumée la réputation d'être que du roi français Henri IV et conservées dans des collections privées successives appartenait effectivement à ce monarque.


Décès du "vert galant" :
Henri IV est probablement le roi français le plus populaire. Il était connu comme «le bon roi Henri» ou, en raison de son attrait pour les femmes », le "vert-galant." En dépit d'être admiré par son peuple, il fut assassiné à Paris à l'âge de 57 ans le 14 mai 1610 par François Ravaillac , un fanatique catholique.

Identification des restes du roi des Français :
La tête de l'homme avait une couleur brun clair, la bouche ouverte, et partiellement fermé les yeux (fig. 1 ⇓). La préservation a été excellent, avec tous les tissus mous et les organes internes bien conservée. Deux caractéristiques souvent vu dans les portraits du monarque (fig 2 ⇓) étaient présents: une lésion foncé en forme de champignon, 11 mm de longueur, juste au-dessus de la narine droite (figure 3A ⇓), 1 et un trou de 4,5 mm central dans le droit lobe de l'oreille avec une patine qui est révélateur de l'utilisation à long terme d'une boucle d'oreille (fig 3B). Nous savons que Henri IV portait une boucle d'oreille dans son lobe de l'oreille droite, comme d'autres du Valois court.2 A 5 mm lésion osseuse guéri était présent sur le maxillaire supérieur gauche (figure 3C), ce qui correspond au traumatisme (blessure par arme blanche) infligées par Jean Châtel lors d'une tentative d'assassinat le 27 Décembre 1594, 2 poils nombreux sièges sociaux et les restes d'une moustache et la barbe ont été présents, ils étaient rouges et blancs en couleurs, avec une longueur maximale de 7 mm, 24 mm et 60 mm, respectivement (figure 3E et F). Cela concorde avec les caractéristiques connues de cheveux du roi au moment de sa mort2 Le chef a aussi montré la preuve de la calvitie-pas de cheveux a été présent sur le pâté. La santé dentaire a été médiocre, avec une perte de dents ante mortem considérables, ce qui correspond aux témoignages des témoins contemporains de du roi.2 Enfin, trois post-mortem cervical inférieur plaies de coupe étaient visibles, ce qui correspond à la séparation de la tête de l'organisme par un révolutionnaire en 1793, dans le cadre de mutilation délibérée.


Voir la version agrandie: Dans un windowDownload nouveau PowerPoint SlideFig 1 latéral gauche (A) et latérale droite (B) Vue de la tête momifiée

Voir la version agrandie: Dans un windowDownload nouveau PowerPoint SlideFig 2 A gauche: vue de face de la statue du roi Henri IV au château de Pau montrant la lésion cutanée nasale. B: gravure française par Ganières montrant le roi portant une boucle d'oreille dans le lobe de l'oreille droite

Voir la version agrandie: Dans un windowDownload nouveau PowerPoint SlideFig 3 Détails des différentes caractéristiques du visage: (A) naevus nasale (flèche), (B) percé lobe de l'oreille droite, (C) post-traumatique lésion osseuse maxillaire, (D) gris dépôt du cuir chevelu, (E) moustache rousse, et (F) poils rouges

D'autres preuves en faveur de l'identification
La datation au radiocarbone de calibration 2-sigma a abouti à une date comprise entre 1450 et 1650, ce qui bien la période de l'année de la mort d'Henri IV (1610) 0,2

Nous n'avons pas pu récupérer intacte des séquences d'ADN mitochondrial à partir des échantillons de la tête, aucune comparaison n'est possible avec d'autres reliques du roi et de ses descendants.

Analyse des différents dépôts de gris (figure 3D) sur la tête ont montré une composition élémentaire et organique correspondant à moulures successives de la tête. Nous savons que trois moulures ont été réalisées sur la tête de Henri IV: tout d'abord sur la tête fraîche en 1610,2, puis sur la tête momifiée en 1793 juste après la profanation, 3 et enfin par un précédent propriétaire (Bourdais) de la tête au début du 20e siècle.

Une reconstruction faciale numérisée du crâne était pleinement compatible avec toutes les représentations connues de Henri IV et le moule en plâtre de son visage juste après sa mort, qui est conservé dans la Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Paris. La tête reconstruit a une forme angulaire, avec un front haut, un grand nez, un menton proéminent et carré (figure 4 ⇓) .2 Superposition du crâne sur le moule en plâtre de son visage et la statue au château de Pau ont montré une similitude parfaite avec égard à toutes ces caractéristiques anatomiques (figure 5 ⇓).


Voir la version agrandie: Dans un windowDownload nouveau PowerPoint SlideFig 4 reconstruction numérique de (A) le visage complet et (B) du côté gauche du visage en utilisant des données provenant de trois tomodensitométrie tridimensionnelle scans du crâne et les caractéristiques particulières de la tête momifiée

Voir la version agrandie: Dans un windowDownload nouveau PowerPoint SlideFig 5 A: superposition numérique de (A) de la tomodensitométrie (à droite vue de face du crâne) à la face du moule fait juste après la mort d'Henri IV. B: superposition numérique de la tomodensitométrie (coupe sagittale du crâne) à la vue du côté gauche de la statue du roi au château de Pau

Une méthode très particulière embaumement
Le rapport d'autopsie du roi Henri IV, publié dans les œuvres complètes du chirurgien (1549-1613) Guillemeau, 4 ont montré que le cerveau n'a pas été examiné. Un tel examen n'est pas systématiquement effectuée lorsque la cause du décès était connu (qui, pour Henri IV a été faite deux coups de couteau dans le thorax par Ravaillac) .2 Un autre pratiquant, Pigray (1532-1613), était en charge de l'embaumement, 5 et il a pris en compte la volonté du roi pour être embaumé "dans le style des Italiens." Cette forme de l'embaumement minimise l'aspect mutilant de la procédure d'embaumement en n'ouvrant pas le crâne, le cerveau et toutes les structures internes restent dans le crâne ( pas scier voûte, aucune évacuation trépanation, sans perforation ethmoïdale). La tomodensitométrie de la tête a confirmé qu'aucun signe de la base du crâne ou un traumatisme voûte (sauf pour la lésion maxillaire ancienne), le sciage, ou l'ouverture de la cavité cérébrale était présent.

Une bande de circonférence de pigment noir a été vu sur la peau à la base du cou. En utilisant la spectroscopie Raman, il a été identifié comme noir d'ivoire, une variété de carbone amorphe. Ce charbon de bois, obtenu par calcination anaérobie des os d'animaux, correspond à celle déposée par le chirurgien Pigray sur la surface du cadavre d'absorber les fluides de décomposition et de putréfaction gases5, la limite précise supérieure de la base du col peut être expliqué par la tête protégée par bandes de tissu de sorte qu'il n'a pas été noirci au cours du processus.

Nous avons trouvé de nombreux dépôts végétaux non identifiables dans la bouche, qui ont été, entre autres, utilisé pour masquer les mauvaises odeurs qui émanaient de l'oral cavity.6 Mercury était parfois utilisée lorsque le crâne a été laissée intacte. Il a été généralement déposés sous forme de sels de cinabre dans les narines, qui ont été serrées avec des segments de textile.6 Dans ce cas, aucune trace de mercure a été trouvé dans les échantillons provenant des narines ou la cavité nasale.


contexte pathologique
La tomodensitométrie a également montré la dure-mère partiellement conservés et séchés parenchyme cérébral, sans structures identifiables momifié anomalies.7 vasculaires et nerveuses ont été observées dans les deux cavités orbitales, et la cavité orbitaire droit contenait une biconvexes dense 7 mm disque. Ce disque correspond à la lentille de l'œil, la forte densité (137 unités Hounsfield) qui indique la présence d'une cataracte. Nous avons également identifié diffuse et modérée spondylarthrose marginal dans toutes les vertèbres cervicales.

Conclusion
Maintenant positivement identifiés selon les arguments les plus rigoureux de tout examen anthropologie médico-légale, la tête du roi français sera inhumé dans la basilique royale de Saint-Denis, après une cérémonie des funérailles solennelles. Des méthodes similaires pourraient être utilisées pour identifier tous les autres rois et reines squelettes couché dans la fosse commune de la basilique, de sorte qu'ils puissent être restitués à leurs tombes originales.
Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3593
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Jeudi 16 Décembre 2010 21:53:45

Je suis frappé par la légèreté des éléments d'identification ! La traçabilité est encore plus douteuse que celle du coeur de Louis XVII . Et on nous explique que la recherche de l'ADN est impossible tout en présentant la conclusion comme certaine ! Cette équipe de chercheurs qui semble ne pas manquer d'audace propose-t-elle d'analyser le contenu du tombeau des Invalides ?
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par BRH » Jeudi 16 Décembre 2010 23:16:24

Je partage votre opinion, François. Il est invraisemblable de ne pas procéder à une analyse ADN, d'autant que deux autres "têtes" d'Henry IV seraient aussi en "circulation"... Le Pr. Lucotte lui-même s'étonne que l'équipe ne cherche pas à aller plus loin. Qu'est-ce que cela cache ?
Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3593
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par BRH » Vendredi 17 Décembre 2010 00:08:43

Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3593
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Samedi 18 Décembre 2010 10:59:18

L'erreur d'attribution de ce crâne à Henri IV a été mise à jour dans un article du 4 septembre 1924(http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k2 ... %22.langFR) par Georges Montorgueil, alias Octave Lebesgue , alias Job,patron de l'Intermédiaire des chercheurs et des curieux et rédacteur en chef du Temps . La contre-preuve décisive me paraît être le témoignage direct de Lenoir , qui assista à la profanation et qui vit le crâne sciée du roi dont le cerveau avait été enlevé(http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k2 ... %22.langFR).Le Figaro en "remit une couche"( http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k2 ... %22.langFR)
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Samedi 18 Décembre 2010 15:00:13

Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Samedi 18 Décembre 2010 16:11:36

Georges d'Heylli restitue en 1872 le récit de dom Poirier , bénédictin chargé par l'Institut de "surveiller l'exhumation" en 1793(http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5 ... pagination) : il confirme que le crâne d'Henri IV était scié et que les aromates qui y avaient été mises à l'emplacement du cerveau dégageaient une odeur très forte ( http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5 ... pagination)
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Samedi 18 Décembre 2010 17:08:06

L'incroyable roman imaginé pour tenter de détruire le témoignage Lenoir auquel se heurte le scoop de "l'équipe des chercheurs"(http://www.parismatch.com/Actu-Match/So ... V-232164/#)
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Samedi 18 Décembre 2010 19:54:08

[b]Le texte même de Lenoir qui confirme qu'il est bien l'auteur du témoignage sur le crâne scié d'Henri IV rempli d'aromates (http://books.google.fr/books?id=jyh1sjv ... CC0Q6AEwAQ ;à la page 104 en chiffres romains :CIV). Comment peut-on se permettre aujourd'hui de taxer Lenoir de mensonge ? Il faudrait supposer que Lenoir ait inventé que le crâne était scié pour dissimuler son larcin de ce crâne non scié ? Invraisemblable ! /b]
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Dimanche 19 Décembre 2010 19:10:16

Dès 1924, on a radiographié le crâne et vérifié l'hypothèse du trou pratiqué par les embaumeurs . La conclusion négative à cet égard de l'équipe de 2010 était donc déjà acquise il y a 86 ans !Cherchez bien! : à la 3° col. de la p.3 du Journal des Débats du 23 septembre 1924 (http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k4 ... %22.langFR)
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Dimanche 19 Décembre 2010 20:19:27

L'Intermédiaire s'est penché sur la question dès 1874 , et en particulier sur l'autre tête attribuée à Henri IV , détenue dans son château par le comte d'Erbach qui disait avoir été témoin de la profanation et avoir acheté la tête du roi à un fossoyeur. L'équipe des chercheurs de 2010 prétend que ce crâne est un faux . Or l'Intermédiaire de 1874 rapporte des témoignages dont il résulte que Henri IV a été mis en pièces par la tourbe ( p.127 - http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6 ... ion.langFR), qu'il manque un morceau au crâne d'Erbach (p.85 - http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6 ... ion.langFR) et que ceci concorde avec un trou pratiqué pour en extraire la cervelle , conformément au témoignage d'Alexandre Lenoir ( p.345 - http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6 ... ion.langFR) . Et si le vrai crâne était celui d'Erbach?
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par BRH » Lundi 20 Décembre 2010 17:59:17

Thomas Delvaux, héraldiste et généalogiste, doctorant d'Histoire à l'Université d'Artois, rejoignant la position de Philippe Delorme, vient de réaliser un résumé excellent des critiques historiographiques à opposer à l'authentification hâtive de la prétendue tête de Henri IV :

http://www.morinie.com/J&E_3.pdf

Nous y souscrivons en tout point.

Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3593
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Re: On aurait retrouvé la tête d'Henry IV !!!

Message par François » Mardi 21 Décembre 2010 15:54:19

Dommage!Le lien est inactif pour moi.
Mes amis comptent plus que mes idées
François
 
Message(s) : 210
Inscription : Mercredi 14 Février 2007 19:25:24

Suivant

Retour vers Les Temps Modernes (1589-1789)

Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce forum : Bing [Bot] et 1 invité

cron