Liste des divisions britanniques SGM

Les Totalitarismes à l'assaut de l'Europe !

Liste des divisions britanniques SGM

Message par BRH » Samedi 08 Août 2015 14:59:49

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_B ... rld_War_II

Armoured
Main article: British Armoured formations of the Second World War

Guards Armoured Division[5]

The division was formed on 17 June 1941, in the United Kingdom. On 12 June 1945, the division was reorganised as the Guards Division.[5] The division served in North West Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war. The Guards took part in the Battle of Normandy, initially having a minor role in Operation Epsom,[6] before taking on much larger roles in Operation Goodwood, and Operation Bluecoat.[7] In September 1944, the division played a prominent role in Operation Market Garden.[8] Afterwards, the division took part in the battles for the Rhineland, the crossing of the Rhine, and the advance to the Elbe.[9] Ended war under command of XXX Corps.[5]

1st Armoured Division[10]

The division was founded in 1937.[11] The division briefly served in France during 1940,[9] from November 1941 until 1944 the division served in the Western Desert and Tunisia, taking part in the battles of Gazala, and the First and Second Battle of El Alamein.[9][12] On 27 May 1944, the division was transferred to Italy, were it fought until 28 October when it ceased operations.[13] On 11 January 1945, the division was disbanded in Italy.[10]

2nd Armoured Division[14]

The division was formed on 15 December 1939, in the United Kingdom. In October 1940, the division was dispatched to Egypt and arrived in January 1941.[14] The division was used to reinforce the 7th Armoured Division, while elements were shipped to Greece. This left an under strength, inexperienced, and ill-equipped division, which was overrun during Rommel's first offensive.[15] The divisional headquarters was captured on 8 April, and on 10 May 1941 the division was formally disbanded.[14]

6th Armoured Division[16]

The division was formed on 12 September 1940, in the United Kingdom.[16] The division first saw service in North Africa from November 1942[17] – where "it was among the first to reach Tunisia as part of First Army[18] – till March 1944, when it was then deployed to Italy. The division fought at Bou Arada, Fondouk, El Kourzia, Tunis, the Liri Valley, Arezzo, Florence, along the Gothic Line, and in the Argenta Gap.[16] Ended war under command of V Corps.[17]

7th Armoured Division[19]

The division was initially formed, in Egypt during the autumn of 1938, as the Mobile Division (Egypt).[20] At the outbreak of the Second World War, the division was redesignated The Armoured Division (Egypt), before finally being called the 7th Armoured Division on 16 February 1940.[19] The division served in the Western Desert and North Africa from the outbreak of the war until September 1943 when it was shipped to Italy. After three months of fighting in Italy,[21] the division was returned to the United Kingdom for the upcoming Battle of Normandy.[22] The division then fought in North West Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war.[21] The division fought in every major battle of the Western Desert Campaign – including Operation Compass and the Second Battle of El Alamein – and took part in the Tunisian campaign.[22] The division fought in the Battle of Normandy (in particular at the Battle of Villers-Bocage), helped in the liberation of the Low Countries, and crossed the Rhine into Germany.[22] Ended war under command of XII Corps.[21]

8th Armoured Division[23]

The division was formed on 4 November 1940, in the United Kingdom. In July 1942 the division was deployed to Egypt, however it never operated as a complete formation during the following six months and was disbanded on 1 January 1943.[23]

9th Armoured Division[24]

The division was formed in the United Kingdom on 1 December 1940. It was never deployed overseas and was disbanded on 31 July 1944.[24]

10th Armoured Division[25]

The division was formed in Palestine, on 1 August 1941, by the redesignation and reorganisation of the 1st Cavalry Division.[25] In April 1942 the division moved to Egypt and later took part in the battles of Alam el Halfa and the Second Battle of El Alamein. In January 1943 the division moved back to Palestine, then on to Syria, before returning to Egypt in September.[26] The division stayed in Egypt until it was disbanded on 15 June 1944.[25]

11th Armoured Division[27]

The division was formed in the United Kingdom, on 9 March 1941.[27] The division was deployed to Normandy in June 1944, playing a prominent role in Operation Epsom.[28] The division would spearhead Operation Goodwood,[29] and take part in Operation Bluecoat.[30] It later liberated Antwerp, helped clear the Low Countries, and took part in Operation Veritable.[22] Ended war under command of VIII Corps.[27]

42nd Armoured Division[31]

The division was formed on 1 November 1941, in the United Kingdom, by conversion of the 42nd (East Lancashire) Infantry Division. The division was never deployed overseas and was disbanded on 17 October 1943.[31]

79th Armoured Division[32]

The division was formed in the United Kingdom on 13 August 1942.[32] In April 1943, the division was reorganised as an administrative formation for the development and usage of specialist vehicles ("Hobart's Funnies"). In this role it never acted as a division.[33][34] Depending on the needs of any particular battle, the division would allocate squadrons, regiments, or brigades to other formations to provide support. The 'division' operated throughout the 1944–45 North West Europe campaign.[35] Ended war under command of 21st Army Group.[32]

Infantry

Guards Division[47]

The division was formed in North West Europe on 12 June 1945, following the reorganisation of the Guards Armoured Division.[47]

1st Infantry Division[48]

Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at Aldershot. Served in France from September 1939 until June 1940, North Africa from March 1943 to December 1943, Italy from December 1943 until January 1945, and in Palestine for most of 1945. Fought at the Medjez Plain, Tunis, Anzio, Rome, and on the Gothic Line. Ended war under HQ, Palestine and Transjordan command.

1st London Division[49]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Finsbury Barracks. Organized as a motor division. 18 November 1940 redesignated 56th (London) Division.

2nd Infantry Division[50]

Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at in Aldershot. Served in France from September 1939 until May 1940, India from June 1942 until April 1944 and April 1945 until August 1945, and in Burma from April 1944 until April 1945. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée, Kohima, and Mandalay. Ended war under command of the Southern Army (part of GHQ India).

2nd London Division[51]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in the London District. Remained in the UK until 1 September 1944, when redesignated the 47th Infantry (Reserve) Division.

3rd Infantry Division[52]

Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at in Bulford. Served in France from September 1939 until June 1940, and in northwestern Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought at Ypres-Comines Canal, assaulted Normandy, Caen, Bourguebus Ridge, Mont Pincon, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine River. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of I Corps.

4th Infantry Division[53]

Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at Colchester. Served in France from October 1939 until June 1940, in North Africa from March 1943 until December 1943, in Egypt from December 1943 until February 1944, in Italy from February 1944 until December 1944, and in Greece from December 1944 until the end of the war. Fought at Oued Zarga, the Medjez Plain, Tunis, Cassino, on the Trasimene Line, Arezzo, Florence, and on the Rimini Line. Ended the war under command of HQ Land Forces (Greece).

5th Infantry Division[54]

Existing division at the start of the war, stationed at Catterick Camp. Served in France from December 1939 until June 1940, in India from May 1942 until August 1942, in Iraq from August 1942 until September 1942, in Persia from September 1942 until January 1943, in Syria February 1943 until June 1943, in Egypt June 1943, in Sicily July 1943 until September 1943, in Italy September 1943 until July 1944, in Palestine July 1944 until February 1945, and in northwestern Europe from March 1945 until the end of the war. Fought at Ypres-Comines Canal, assaulted Sicily, on the Sangro River, on the Garigliano River, Anzio, and Rome. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under the command of VIII Corps.

6th Infantry Division[55]

Formed twice during the war. Initially formed on 3 November 1939, by renaming the 7th Infantry Division.[56] The division was dissolved in June 1940, following the Italian declaration of war, and its headquarters was transformed into the Western Desert Force.[57][55] The division was reformed on 17 February 1941.[55] Elements of the division fought in Battle of Crete, while the rest of the division was held in reserve in Egypt.[58] The division then fought in the Syria–Lebanon Campaign, in particular the Battle of Damascus.[59][60] The division remained in Syria until transferred to Tobruk, and renamed the 70th Infantry Division.[61][62][55]

7th Infantry Division[63]

Existing division at the start of the war based in Palestine. At the beginning of the war, the division gave up command of its subordinate units while the headquarters transferred to Mersa Matruh, Egypt, the forward British base in the area. The division then took command of all infantry in the area. On 3 November 1939, the division was redesignated 6th Infantry Division.[56][64]

8th Infantry Division[65]

Existing division at the start of the war, stationed in Palestine. 28 February 1940 disbanded in Palestine, while under command of HQ Palestine and Transjordan.

8th Division (Syria)[66]

2 June 1942 8th Division HQ formed to control administrative units in Syria; disbanded 31 October 1943 in Syria.

9th (Highland) Infantry Division[67]

Formed September 1939 in the UK. 7 August 1940 redesignated 51st (Highland) Infantry Division.

12th (Eastern) Infantry Division[68]

Formed 10 October 1939 in the UK. Served in France from April 1940 until June 1940. 11 July 1940 disbanded in the UK.

12th Division (SDF)[69]

Formed 11 July 1942 in the Sudan, from the 1st Sudan Defence Force Brigade. 12 January 1945 redesignated Sudan Defence Force Group (North Africa).

15th (Scottish) Infantry Division[70]

Formed September 1939 in the UK. Served in northwestern Europe from 14 June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought on the Odon River, at Caen, Mont Pincon, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of VIII Corps.

18th Infantry Division[71]

Formed 30 September 1939 in the UK. Served in India January 1942 and in Malaya February 1942. 15 February 1942 captured by the Japanese Army in Malaya. Fought on Singapore Island.

23rd (Northumbrian) Division[72]

Formed 2 October 1939 in the UK. Served in France from April 1940 until June 1940. 30 June 1940 disbanded in the UK.

36th Infantry Division[73]

Formed 1 September 1944 in Burma by redesignation of the 36th Indian Infantry Division. Served in Burma from September 1944 until May 1945, and in India from May 1945 until the end of the war. Fought at Mandalay and along the Rangoon Road. Under command of Southern Army (part of GHQ India) at the end of the war.

38th (Welsh) Infantry Division[74]

Formed September 1939 in the UK 1 September 1944 redesignated 38th Infantry (Reserve) Division. Ended the war in Europe under the command of Western Command.

42nd (East Lancashire) Infantry Division[75]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Manchester. Served in Belgium and France from April 1940 until June 1940. 1 November 1941 redesignated 42nd Armoured Division.

43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division[76]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Salisbury. Served in northwestern Europe from 24 June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought on the Odon River, at Caen, Bourguebus Ridge, Mont Pincon, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XXX Corps.

44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division[77] – Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Royal Artillery Barracks, Woolwich. Served in France and Belgium from April 1940 until June 1940, and in Egypt from July 1942 until January 1943. 31 December 1943 disbanded in the Middle East. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée, Alam el Halfa, and El Alamein.
45th Infantry Division[78]

Formed September 1939 in the UK. August 1944 division dispersed. 1 September 1944 Redesignated 45th (Holding) Division. 1 December 1944 redesignated 45th Division. Under War Office Control at the end of the war.

46th Infantry Division[79]

Formed 2 October 1939 in the UK. Served in France and Belgium from April 1940 until June 1940, North Africa from January 1943 until September 1943, Italy from September 1943 until March 1944, July 1944 until January 1945 and April 1945 until May 1945, Egypt in March 1944 and June 1944, Palestine from April 1944 until June 1944, Greece from January 1945 until April 1945, and in Austria as an occupation force. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée, El Kouriza, Tunis, Salerno, Naples, on the Volturno River, Monte Camino, on the Gothic Line, Coriano, on the Rimini Line, and on the Lamone River. Ended the war in Europe under command of V Corps.

47th (London) Infantry Division[80]

Formed 21 November 1940 in the UK by redesignation of the 2nd London Division. August 1944 division dispersed. 1 September 1944 redesignated 47th Infantry (Reserve) Division.

48th (South Midland) Infantry Division[80]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Oxford. Served in France and Belgium from January 1940 until June 1940. 20 December 1942 redesignated 48th Infantry (Reserve) Division. Fought at St Omer-La Bassée.

49th (West Riding) Infantry Division[81]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Clifton, York. 5 April 1940 disbanded in the UK 10 June 1940 reconstituted in the UK. Served in northwestern Europe from 12 June 1944 until the end of the war. Fought on the Odon River and in the Scheldt Estuary. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under the command of I Canadian Corps.

50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division[82]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Darlington. Organized as a motor division. Served in France and Belgium from January 1940 until June 1940, Egypt from June 1941 until July 1941, February 1942, from June 1942 until December 1942, and from May 1943 until September 1943, Cyprus from July 1941 until November 1941, Syria from January 1942 until February 1942, Libya from February 1942 until June 1942, from December 1943 until March 1943, and from April 1943 until May 1943, North Africa from March 1943 until April 1943, Sicily from July 1943 until October 1943, and northwestern Europe from June 1944 until December 1944. 16 December 1944 redesignated an Infantry (Reserve) Division in the UK. August 1945 arrived in Norway and retitled HQ British Land Forces Norway. Fought at Ypres-Comines Canal, Gazala, Mersa Matruh, El Alamein, Mareth, Akarit, Enfidaville, assaulted Sicily, assaulted Normandy, and in the Nederrijn.

51st (Highland) Infantry Division[83]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Cragie, Perth. Served in France from 24 January 1940 until June 1940. 12 June 1940 captured at Saint-Valery-en-Caux. 7 August 1940 reconstituted by redesignation of the 9th (Highland) Infantry Division. Served in Egypt from August 1942 until November 1942, Libya from November 1942 until February 1943, North Africa from February 1943 until July 1943, and northwestern Europe from June 1944 until the end of the campaign in northwestern Europe. Fought at El Alamein, Medenine, Mareth, Akarit, Enfidaville, Tunis, assaulted Sicily, Adrano, Bourguebus Ridge, Falaise, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XXX Corps.

52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division[84]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Glasgow. Trained at various times as both a mountain and airlanding division, but never used in either role. Served in France June 1940 and in northwestern Europe from October 1944 until the end of the war in Europe. Fought in the Scheldt Estuary, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XXX Corps.

53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division[85]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Shrewsbury. Served in northwestern Europe from June 1944 until the end of the war in Europe. Fought on the Odon River, at Caen, Mont Pincon, Falaise, the Nederrijn, the Rhineland, and across the Rhine. Ended the campaign in northwestern Europe under command of XII Corps.

54th (East Anglian) Infantry Division[86]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in The Barracks, Hertford. 14 December 1943 disbanded in the UK.

55th (West Lancashire) Infantry Division[87]

Existing Territorial Army division at the start of the war, with headquarters in Liverpool. Never left the UK. Ended the war under command of Western Command.

56th (London) Infantry Division[88]

Formed 18 November 1940 by redesignation of the 1st London Division. Served in Iraq from November 1942 until March 1943, Palestine in March 1943, Egypt from March 1943 until April 1943 and from April 1944 until July 1944, Libya in April 1943 and from May 1943 until August 1943, and in Italy from September 1943 until March 1944 and from July 1944 until the end of the war in Europe. Fought at Enfidaville, Tunis, Salerno, Naples, on the Volturno River, Monte Camino, on the Garigliano River, Anzio, on the Gothic Line, Coriano, on the Rimini Line, on the Lamone River, and in the Argenta Gap. Ended the war in Europe under command of XIII Corps.

59th (Staffordshire) Infantry Division[89]

Formed 4 September 1939 in the UK. Fought at Caen and Mount Pincon. Served in northwestern Europe from June 1944 until October 1944. 19 October 1944 disbanded in northwestern Europe.

61st Infantry Division[90]

Formed September 1939 in the UK. Never left the UK. Ended the war under command of Eastern Command.

66th Infantry Division[91]

Formed September 1939 in the UK 22 June 1940 disbanded in the UK.

70th Infantry Division[92]

Formed on 10 October 1941, when the 6th Infantry Division replaced the Australian garrison in Tobruk.[55][93] The division remained as the garrison of the port for the remainder of the siege, until it broke out as part of Operation Crusader.[94] Following Crusader and the Japanese entry into the war, the division departed Egypt on 28 February and arrived in India on 10 March.[95] The division was held in reserve, undertook jungle warfare training, and was used as a police force to suppress Indian discontent.[96][97][98][99][100][101][102] On 25 October, the division was broken up and all troops were transferred to Special Force.[103][104]

76th Infantry Division[105]

The division was formed on 18 November 1941 from the re-organisation of the Norfolk County Division. On 20 December 1942, the division was re-named the 76th Infantry (Reserve) Division and became Eastern Command's training formation. The division was used to complete the training of new recruits and as a source of reinforcements for divisions overseas. On 1 September 1944, the division was disbanded.[106][107][108]

77th Infantry Division[109]

Formed 1 December 1941 by redesignation of the Devon and Cornwall County Division in the UK 20 December 1942 redesignated 77th Infantry (Reserve) Division in the UK 1 September 1944 disbanded in the UK.

78th Infantry Division[110]

Formed 25 May 1942 in the UK to take part in Operation Torch. Served in North Africa from November 1942 until July 1943, Sicily from July 1943 until September 1943, Italy from September 1943 until July 1944 when it was sent to Egypt for rest and regrouping. It rejoined the campaign in Italy in September 1944 remaining until the end of hostilities there in early May 1945. Ended the war in Austria under command of V Corps. Fought in Tunisia at Tebourba Gap, Oued Zarga, Medjez Plain, Tunis; in Sicily at Adrano and Centuripe; and in Italy at Termoli, on the Sangro River, Cassino, in the Liri Valley, on the Trasimene Line, Florence (Gothic Line), on the Senio River, and in the Argenta Gap.

80th Infantry (Reserve) Division[111]

The division was formed on 1 January 1943 as Western Command's training formation. The division was used to complete the training of new recruits and as a source of reinforcements for divisions overseas.[111][107][108] On 1 September 1944, the division was disbanded.[111]
Tant que les Français constitueront une nation, ils se souviendront de mon nom !

Napoléon
Avatar de l’utilisateur
BRH
 
Message(s) : 3620
Inscription : Lundi 22 Janvier 2007 18:18:29

Retour vers Les années 30 et la Seconde Guerre Mondiale (1930-1945)

Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 1 invité