L'Énigme des Invalides

Nous sommes actuellement le 12 Déc 2018 2:51

Le fuseau horaire est UTC+1 heure




Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 3 message(s) ] 
Auteur Message
Message Publié : 26 Mars 2005 12:28 
Hors-ligne
Rédacteur
Rédacteur
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 14 Déc 2002 15:30
Message(s) : 13674
Nous devons à notre ami Albert de connaître ce texte en Anglais.

Hudson Lowe’s dispatch to Lord Bathurst
14th May 1821

Marked “Separate”

My Lord
[…]
He [Count Montholon] took the earliest opportunity afterwards to press me for a reply and availed himself at the same time of the authority which he said had been delegated to him by General Bonaparte to make known to me what he said was one of his dying requests. This request was that his heart should be sent to his wife the Archduchess Maria Louisa. I acquainted Count Montholon that my orders were to inter the body on this island and that I could not be said to do so if I suffered any part of it to be taken away from hence.
This proposal was made to me before the body was opened and Count Montholon acquainted me at the same time that General Bonaparte having it thought probable that the disease under which he had been suffering was the same as that of which his father had died, viz, a schirrus or cancer of the pylorus, had been desirous his body should be opened as a means to discover if any remedy could be found to preserve his son from the same disease. We had no further conversation at the moment respecting the heart. Count Montholon only expressed his desire, I would consider his application to me and give him an answer upon it.
When the body was opened, Professor Antommarchi who was the principal operator, wished to keep the heart and the diseased part of the stomach, separate from the body. An objection was made to this on the part of the medical gentlemen on account of their having received no direction from me on the subject. Count Montholon then came forward in a very earnest manner to Sir Thomas Reade who was in the room during the dissection, to beg that the heart might be left out, until the matter was referred to me, and to this proposal, Sir Thomas Reade with whom I had some previous conversation in anticipation of what might occur, assented.
[…]
I therefore adressed a letter to the Count of which copy is enclosed, and at the same time told him that my determination was, with respect to the heart, that I could not suffer it to be removed from the island but it might be put seperately, preserved in any way he pleased, in a vase, and placed in the same coffin with the rest of the body. This attention, I considered within myself, to be due to the illustrous personage to whom Count Montholon had acquainted me, it was the desire of General Bonaparte his heart should be given, thinking it equally an act of due attention to her, not to yield to Count Montholon’s desire of conveying the heart at once to her, uninformed as I naturally must be, in what light after so long a cessation of any relation together, whether a public or domestic nature, such bequest might be viewed. The heart which had been preserved in spirits of wine, was consequently put into a small silver vase, the stomach in another, and both placed in the coffin with the body.
Mr Rutlegde, assistant surgeon of the 20th regiment, was the person who soldered up the vases in which the heart and the stomach were placed, and saw them put into the coffin. The undertakers being also present.
The body when deposited in the coffin was dressed in the plain uniform of a French Colonel of Chasseurs.
The coffin at the particular desire of Count Montholon was constructed as follows:
1. a plain coffin lined with tin
2. a lead coffin
3. a mahogany coffin
Count Montholon wished to have the words ‘Napoléon, né à Ajaccio 15 aout 1769, mort à Ste Hélène 5 mai 1821’, inscribed in it. I wished the word Bonaparte to be inserted after Napoleon. To this Count Montholon objected and therefore no inscription whatsoever was placed on it.
The grave was formed in the following manner.
A large pit was sunk, of a sufficient width all round, to admit of a wall two feet thick of solid masonry, being constructed on each side; thus forming an exact oblong, the hollow space within which was precisely twelve feet deep, near eight feet long, and five wide. A bed of masonry was at the bottom. Upon this foundation, supported by 8 square stones each a foot in height, there was laid a slab of white stone, five inches thick, four other slabs of the same thickness closed the sides and ends, which being joined at the angles by Roman cement formed a species of stone grave or sarcophages. This was just of depth sufficient to admit the coffin being placed within it. Another large slab of white stone which was supported on one side by two pullies, was let down upon the grave, after the coffin had been put into it, and every interstice afterwards filled with stones and roman cement. Above the slab of white stone which formed the cover of the grave, two layers of masonry strongly cemented, and even cramped together, were built in, so as to unite with the two foot walk which supported the earth on each side, and the vacant space between this last work of masonry and the surface of the ground, being about eight feet in depth was afterwards filled up with earth. The whole was then covered in a little above the level of the ground with another bad of flat stones whose external surface extending to the brink of the two foot wall on each side of the grave, covers a space of twelve feet long and nine feet wide.
A guard has been placed over the grave.
[…]
Two large willow trees overshadow the tomb, and there is a grove of them in a little distance below it. The ground is the property of a Mr Torbett, a respectable tradesman in this island, who has a neat little cottage close adjoining to it. He assented with great readiness of the body being buried there. I shall cause railing to be put round the whole of the ground, it being necessary even for the preservation of the willows, many sprigs from which had already began to be taken by different individuals who went down to visit the place after the corpse was interred.
The day after the funeral, I visited on Count Montholon to be informed of the testamentary disposition General Bonaparte had made, being as I had before understood from him, not a will but a codicil to his will. He immmediately assented to show it to me, but said it was necessary Count Bertrand, Signor Vignali and Marchand be present. […] The Count told me he had been particularly enjoined not to show the will to any person but myself. I insisted however upon Sir Thomas Reade’s accompanying me and being present when the will was opened.
[…]
After perusing the contents [of the will], I returned it back to Count Montholon and told him I could not decide upon its validity in a legal point of view but that if I with held my decision upon it, it would not be with any intention to oppose its execution.
[…]
With respect to the will, I had it not in intention either to admit or dispute its validity, leaving it to the natural heirs to litigate any point that might arise upon it.
[…]

L'expédition de Hudson Lowe au seigneur Bathurst le 14 mai 1821
marqué "séparé"
mon seigneur [... ]

qu'il [ comte Montholon ] a saisi l'occasion la plus tôt de me serrer après pour une réponse et s'est servie en même temps de l'autorité qu'il a dite lui avoir été délégué par le Général Bonaparte pour faire connaître à moi ce qu'il a dit sur ses demandes après mort. Cette demande était que son coeur devrait être envoyé à son épouse l'Archiduchesse Maria Louisa. J'ai mis au courant le comte Montholon que mes ordres étaient de conserver le corps sur cette île et qu'on ne pourrait pas dire que je fais ainsi si je souffrais que n'importe quelle partie soit emporté par conséquent. Cette proposition m'a été faite avant que le corps ait été ouvert et le comte Montholon m'a mis au courant pendant que le Général Bonaparte l'ayant pensait le probable que la maladie sous laquelle il avait été douleur ait été identique qui de ce que son père était mort, à savoir, un schirrus ou un cancer du pylore, avait été désireux à son corps devrait être ouverte en tant que des moyens de découvrir si n'importe quel remède pourrait s'avérer pour préserver son fils de la même maladie. Nous n'avons eu aucune autre conversation à l'heure actuelle concernant le coeur. Comte Montholon a seulement exprimé son désir, je considérerais son application à moi et lui donnerais une réponse sur elle. Quand le corps a été ouvert, professeur Antommarchi qui était l'opérateur principal, souhaité pour garder le coeur et la pièce malade de l'estomac, séparé du corps. Une objection a été faite à ceci de la part des médecins à cause n'ayant reçu aucune direction de moi sur le sujet. Le comte Montholon est alors venu en avant d'une façon très sérieuse à monsieur Thomas Reade qui était dans la chambre pendant la dissection, pour prier que le coeur pourrait être omis, jusqu'à ce que la matière m'ait été mentionnée, et à cette proposition, monsieur Thomas Reade avec qui j'ai eu une certaine conversation précédente en prévision de ce qui pourrait se produire, approuvé. [... ] ai adressé donc une lettre au comte duquel la copie est incluse, et lui a en même temps indiqué que que ma détermination était, en ce qui concerne le coeur, que je ne pourrais pas souffrir lui à enlever de l'île mais elle pourrait être mis seperately, préservé de quelque façon qu'il a satisfait, dans un vase, et être placé dans le même cercueil avec le reste du corps. Cette attention, j'ai considéré comme étant chez me, dû au personage illustrous à qui le compte Montholon m'avait mis au courant, il étais le désir du Général Bonaparte que son coeur devrait être donné, le pensant également un acte d'une attention due à elle, pour ne pas rapporter à Montholon de compte le désir de donner le coeur immédiatement à elle, tout non informé que je naturellement dois être, dans quelle lumière après que tellement longtemps un cessation de toute relation ensemble, si une nature publique ou domestique, un tel legs pourrait être regardée. Le coeur qui avait été préservé dans les spiritueux du vin, a été par conséquent mis dans un petit vase argenté, l'estomac dans d'autre, et tous les deux placés dans le cercueil avec le corps. M. Rutlegde, chirurgien auxiliaire du 20ème régiment, était la personne qui a soudé vers le haut des vases en lesquels le coeur et l'estomac ont été placés, et les a vus mis dans le cercueil. Les entrepreneurs étant également présents. Le corps une fois déposé dans le cercueil a été habillé dans le simple uniforme d'un colonel français de Chasseurs. Le cercueil au désir particulier du comte Montholon a été construit comme suit:
1. un simple cercueil garni d'étain
2. un cercueil de plomb.
3. un cercueil d'acajou
Montholon sur le cercueil a souhaité avoir les mots 'Napoléon, l'aout 1769, le mai 1821 d'Ajaccio 15 de à de né de chambre Hélène 5 de à de mort ', inscrit. J'ai souhaité le mot Bonaparte à insérer après Napoleon. À cela comte Montholon s'est opposé et donc aucune inscription quelque n'a été placée là-dessus. La tombe a été formée de la façon suivante. Un grand puits a été descendu, d'une largeur suffisante tou'en rond, pour admettre d'un mur deux pieds d'épaisseur de la maçonnerie pleine, étant construit de chaque côté; de ce fait formant un oblong exact, l'espace creux dans lequel était de avec précision douze pieds de profond, près de huit pieds de long, et cinq larges. Un lit de la maçonnerie était au fond. Sur cette base, soutenue par la place chaque un pied dans la taille, on a étendu une galette de pierre blanche, cinq po. d'épaisseur, quatre autres galettes de la même épaisseur ont fermé les côtés et les extrémités, qu'étant joint aux angles par le ciment de Roman a formé une espèce de la tombe ou des sarcophages en pierre. C'était juste de la profondeur suffisamment pour admettre le cercueil étant placé dans lui. Une autre grande galette de la pierre blanche qui a été soutenue d'un côté par deux poulies, était a laissé vers le bas sur la tombe, après que le cercueil ait été mis dans lui, et chaque interstice après rempli de pierres et de ciment romain. Au-dessus de la galette de la pierre blanche qui a formé la couverture de la tombe, deux couches de la maçonnerie fortement cimentées, et même à l'etroit ensemble, ont été incorporées, afin d'unir à la promenade de deux pieds qui a soutenu la terre de chaque côté, et à l'espace vide entre ce dernier travail de la maçonnerie et de la surface de la terre, étant d'environ huit pieds de détaillée ait été après remplie de terre. Le tout a été alors couvert dans au-dessus du niveau de la terre d'un autre mauvais des pierres plates dont la surface externe se prolonger au bord du mur de deux pieds de chaque côté de la tombe, couvre un espace de douze pieds de long et de neuf pieds de large. Une garde a été placée au-dessus de la tombe.
[... ]

Deux grands arbres de saule éclipsent le tombeau, et il y a une plantation d'eux dans une petite distance au-dessous d'elle. La terre est la propriété de M. Torbett, un marchand respectable en cette île, qui a se toucher étroit de petite petite maison ordonnée à elle. Il a approuvé avec la grande promptitude du corps étant enterré là. Je causerai la balustrade d'être mise autour de la totalité de la terre, il étant nécessaire même pour la conservation des saules, beaucoup de sprigs desquels ont eu ont déjà commencé à être pris par les différents individus qui sont descendus pour visiter l'endroit après que le cadavre ait été interred. Le jour après l'enterrement, j'ai visité sur le comte Montholon à informer du Général Bonaparte de disposition testamentary avais fait, étant comme j'ai eu avant compris de lui, pas volonté de a mais un avenant au sien . Il a immmediately approuvé pour me le montrer, mais dit lui était le comte nécessaire Bertrand, Signor Vignali et Marchand soit présent
[... ] le comte m'a dit qu'il avait été en particulier encouragé pour ne pas montrer la volonté à toute personne mais à moi-même. J'ai exigé cependant sur monsieur Thomas Reade's m'accompagnant et étant présent où la volonté a été ouverte. [... ]

Après avoir lu attentivement les teneurs [ de la volonté ], je l'ai renvoyée de nouveau au comte Montholon et dit lui me ne pourrais pas décider sur sa validité dans un point de vue légal mais cela s'I avec tenait ma décision sur lui, il ne serait pas avec aucune intention de s'opposer à son exécution. [... ] En ce qui concerne la volonté, je l'ai eue pas dans l'intention d'admettre ou contester sa validité, le soin laissant aux héritiers normaux pour plaider n'importe quel point qui pourrait surgir sur lui. [... ]

Autre traduction :

La tombe a été formée de la manière suivante.
Une grande fosse fut creusée, d'une largeur suffisante, pour admettre une muraille de deux pieds d'épaisseur en maçonnerie solide, construite de chaque côté; formant ainsi un oblong exact, l'espace creux à l'intérieur de laquelle avait précisément douze pieds de profondeur, près de huit pieds de long et cinq de large. Un lit de maçonnerie était au fond. Sur cette fondation, supportée par 8 pierres carrées d'un pied chacune, était posée une dalle de pierre blanche de cinq pouces d'épaisseur, quatre autres dalles de même épaisseur fermaient les côtés et les extrémités, qui étaient jointes aux angles par le ciment romain. formé une espèce de pierre tombale ou de sarcophages. C'était juste de profondeur suffisante pour admettre le cercueil étant placé en son sein. Une autre grande dalle de pierre blanche, soutenue d'un côté par deux poulies, fut déposée sur la tombe, après que le cercueil eut été mis en place, et tous les interstices furent ensuite remplis de pierres et de ciment romain. Au-dessus de la dalle de pierre blanche qui formait la couverture de la tombe, deux couches de maçonnerie solidement cimentées, et même serrées les unes contre les autres, étaient construites, de manière à s'unir à la promenade de deux pieds qui soutenait la terre de chaque côté. l'espace entre ce dernier travail de maçonnerie et la surface du sol, d'environ huit pieds de profondeur, fut ensuite rempli de terre. Le tout était alors recouvert un peu au-dessus du niveau du sol avec un autre mauvais des pierres plates dont la surface externe s'étendant au bord de la paroi des deux pieds de chaque côté de la tombe, couvre un espace de douze pieds de long et neuf pieds de large .
Un garde a été placé sur la tombe.


Haut
 Profil  
 
 Sujet du message :
Message Publié : 29 Mars 2005 16:43 
Quelle conclusion en tirez vous ?


Haut
  
 
Message Publié : 14 Avr 2005 9:24 
Hors-ligne
Rédacteur
Rédacteur
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Inscription : 14 Déc 2002 15:30
Message(s) : 13674
J'en tire comme conclusion que la date du 14 mai 1821 n'est pas prouvée. En effet, Albert m'a indiqué ne pas avoir pu obtenir une reproduction du rapport qu'il a consulté. Les références à un rapport destiné à Bathurst en date du 14 mai 1821 ne sont pas contenues dans le document, mais à part et résultent d'une écriture d'un archiviste ou d'un secrétaire.


Haut
 Profil  
 
Afficher les messages publiés depuis :  Trier par  
Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 3 message(s) ] 

Le fuseau horaire est UTC+1 heure


Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 1 invité


Vous ne pouvez pas publier de nouveaux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas éditer vos messages dans ce forum
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages dans ce forum

Recherche de :
Aller vers :  
cron
Propulsé par phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Traduction et support en françaisHébergement phpBB